The Pony Express

Filed under Showcase, Voices

Dasha compares Russian, American holiday celebrations

This+is+Dasha+Eremeeva%27s+last+column+for+The+Pony+Express.+She+has+signed+to+play+at+the+University+of+North+Florida+in+Jacksonville%2C+Florida.
Back to Article
Back to Article

Dasha compares Russian, American holiday celebrations

This is Dasha Eremeeva's last column for The Pony Express. She has signed to play at the University of North Florida in Jacksonville, Florida.

This is Dasha Eremeeva's last column for The Pony Express. She has signed to play at the University of North Florida in Jacksonville, Florida.

This is Dasha Eremeeva's last column for The Pony Express. She has signed to play at the University of North Florida in Jacksonville, Florida.

This is Dasha Eremeeva's last column for The Pony Express. She has signed to play at the University of North Florida in Jacksonville, Florida.

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Christmas is coming! So it is time to talk about winter holidays. Christmas is a great holiday in America. Students are free from the school and nobody is working. Most of the people spend Christmas break with their families. Everybody prepares presents for each other, decorates the Christmas tree and house with the lights, and just enjoys every minute of this magic time. But what do you know about how people celebrate Christmas on the other side of the ocean?

I would like to tell how Russians celebrate this amazing holiday. First, all countries in Europe celebrate Christmas on the night from January 6 to 7. It’s Orthodox Christmas. Some people go to the church (most of them with children) to attend a Christmas liturgy. Some people stay home with family and eat duck with orange sauce. Also, people visit relatives and friends and having a dinner all together. On Christmas Eve young women like to tell fortunes by using candles and mirrors and invoke the image of their future husband.

Similar to how Americans celebrate Christmas, Russians celebrate New Year. It is a greater holiday in Russia than Christmas. People start to prepare for this beginning at the end of November. We have traditional food for New Year, for example, salad Olivier (ham, potato, small kosher dill pickles, dill, carrots, mayonnaise, peas, and boiled eggs). In addition, irreplaceable fruit for this holiday is mandarins. Also, Russians cook so much food which names, actually, hard to explain because it might seem very weird for Americans, but it is very delicious for Russians. Also, we decorate a New Year tree. Under the tree, parents put the gifts for the children and say that Santa Claus (Grandfather Frost in Russian) brought them. So, on December 31 when the time nears midnight everyone goes to fill their glasses with champagne and prepares to make a wish. Then people drink, eat, exchange presents, make fireworks and enjoy this amazing time. Usually, everybody is hanging out all night long.

The next morning, some people wake up at about 1-3 p.m. (some people do not wake up at all this day because they drank too much the night before) and go to visit their friends. Every street in the center of the city is decorated with New Year lights. Also, you can meet the New Year deer or snowman on the streets. Some people dress up as Grandfather Frost (Santa Claus) and go to amuse children (sometimes adult people too) to the public places. People play snow fight, ride from the ice slides and have fun. New Year holidays are the most interesting time of the year. All Russian people love it and look forward to it. Usually, Russian Christmas break or New Year break is from December 30 till January 10.

I do not know why Americans do not celebrate New Year as much as Russians. I miss the Russian New Year. On the other hand, I knew how Americans celebrate Christmas and I think it’s very nice. It seems to me so warm, family, and wonderful time. I love Christmas in the USA. Russia and America are very different countries, but, as you can see, our traditions of celebrating holidays are similar. It is all about family, love, having fun and enjoying every minute of this time.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Leave a Comment

If you want a picture to show with your comment, go get a gravatar.




Navigate Left
  • Dasha compares Russian, American holiday celebrations

    Alumni News

    Panola hosts 82nd Commencement

  • Dasha compares Russian, American holiday celebrations

    Alumni News

    Louisiana Tech names McCray head volleyball coach

  • Dasha compares Russian, American holiday celebrations

    Fillies Basketball

    Fillies are 3-0 in conference play

  • Dasha compares Russian, American holiday celebrations

    News

    Panola Men overcome Lamar State Port Arthur

  • Dasha compares Russian, American holiday celebrations

    Band

    Love, Actually happened at Christmas in Carthage

  • Dasha compares Russian, American holiday celebrations

    Alumni News

    In Memoriam: Elizabeth R. “Liz” Hedges

  • Dasha compares Russian, American holiday celebrations

    News

    Cosmetology sponsors fundraiser

  • Dasha compares Russian, American holiday celebrations

    News

    Final Exams start Thursday, Dec. 6

  • Dasha compares Russian, American holiday celebrations

    Community News

    Library gallery showcases student art, photography

  • Dasha compares Russian, American holiday celebrations

    Entertainment

    I Gelosi Photo Gallery

Navigate Right
The student news site of Panola College.
Dasha compares Russian, American holiday celebrations